Jump to Any Race
GOVERNORS overview|By Jennifer Duffy, December 2, 2016

The 38 Governors races on the ballot in 2017 and 2018 may end up being the biggest story of the cycle. There is a lot at stake for both parties as most of the Governors elected this cycle will be in office in 2021 when the next round of redistricting takes place. Thus, there is no time like the present to unveil the first iteration of gubernatorial ratings of the cycle.

National Politics|By Charlie Cook, December 2, 2016

In just a few weeks Demo­crats have gone from driv­ing for what figured to be an easy lay up to hav­ing the rest of the sea­son can­celled, with the next sea­son in real doubt. They seemed to have the pres­id­ency in hand, a ma­jor­ity in the Sen­ate very likely, and, while win­ning a ma­jor­ity in the House was al­ways un­real­ist­ic, they did seem to have a good chance to cut the GOP...

GOVERNORS overview|By Jennifer Duffy, December 2, 2016

This list of potential candidates for the 2017/2018 election is highly speculative and contains names that have been mentioned as either publicly or privately considering candidacies, or worthy of consideration as candidates or recruiting prospects by the parties or interest groups.

National Politics|By Amy Walter, December 1, 2016

In many ways President-elect Trump is exactly the guy he was when he was candidate Trump. He remains obsessed with real or perceived slights — using twitter to lash out at those who he dissed or dismissed him. He is infatuated with how the press covers him and yet has set the record in modern era for days he’s gone without holding a post election press conference. 

National Politics|By David Wasserman, December 1, 2016

The tracker will be updated in real time as vote totals continue to update.

National Politics|By Charlie Cook, November 22, 2016

At least half of Washington and plenty of people beyond the Beltway are taking a crash course in Donald Trump, trying to better understand the most unconventional President-elect this country has ever seen. One of the more interesting insights I’ve come across was in a Sept. 23 article for The Atlantic by Salena Zito, who observed that “the press takes him [Trump] literally, but not seriously,...

GOVERNORS overview|By Jennifer Duffy, November 18, 2016

The presidential race wasn’t the only surprise on election night. In an evening full of weird, the 12 gubernatorial contests produced some unexpected results.

National Politics|By Charlie Cook, November 18, 2016

Be­fore as­sign­ing blame for why Hil­lary Clin­ton lost a race that she was sup­posed to win, it seems ap­pro­pri­ate to first give cred­it to the vic­tor. Wheth­er you like or agree with Pres­id­ent-elect Don­ald Trump, you have to give him cred­it for see­ing and tap­ping in­to something that few oth­ers saw. From his gil­ded 58th floor, three-story apart­ment in Trump Tower over­look­ing...

National Politics|By Charlie Cook, November 15, 2016

If there is a contradiction in Tuesday’s presidential-election results, it’s that Americans desperately wanted change even as they felt things seemed to be changing too fast. Donald Trump didn’t get elected because voters saw him as a safe choice. When exit polls asked whether they felt Trump and Hillary Clinton were qualified to be president, 52 percent said Clinton was and 47 percent said she...

  • In 2014, a good political environment, a weakened Democratic President and several open Democratic-held seats in red states combined to give Senate Republicans a nine-seat gain and the majority. In 2016, the tables are turned. Republicans will defend 24 seats to just 10 for Democrats. Of those 24 seats, President Obama carried the states of five of them in 2012 by at least five points, and carried two more by one and three points. Neither party has been helped by open seats, particularly compared to the last three cycles. Democrats need five seats – or four if they retain the White House – to take back the majority. Wth two weeks before Election Day, Democrats appear to be on track to pick up between four and six seats.

  • The 2016 election resulted in a House breakdown of 240 Republicans and 194 Democrats, with one Louisiana seat headed to a December 10 runoff that is very likely to be won by a Republican. Democrats scored a net gain of six seats, a disappointing result for a party that had hoped to pick up more than 15 and cut the GOP's majority in half. Democrats' best hope for a majority in 2018 would be an unpopular President Donald Trump. But given Republicans' redistricting advantages and how well sorted-out the House has become, it could still be very difficult for Democrats to pick up the 24 seats they would need.

  • The 2016 cycle will host 12 gubernatorial contests, including the special election in Oregon. Democrats are defending eight seats to four for Republicans. The marquis contests will be the Democratic-held open seats in Missouri, New Hampshire and West Virginia, and in North Carolina where GOP Gov. Pat McCrory is seeking a second term. With so few seats on the ballot, neither party is likely to make significant gains or sustain big losses.

Wisconsin  |  District 08  |  Ribble (R)

Lean R
Likely R

New York  |  District 24  |  Katko (R)

Lean R
Likely R

New York  |  District 22  |  Hanna (R)

Toss Up
Lean R

New York  |  District 03  |  Israel (D)

Likely D
Lean D

New York  |  District 01  |  Zeldin (R)

Lean R
Likely R

The Cook Political Report is...

  • A newsletter that both parties regard as authoritative.
    – The New York Times
  • The bible of the political community.
    – Bob Schieffer, host of CBS News "Face the Nation"
  • Perhaps the best nonpartisan tracker of Congressional races.
    – David Broder, The Washington Post

Charlie Cook's Column

Uphill Climb for Democrats in 2018

December 2, 2016

In just a few weeks Demo­crats have gone from driv­ing for what figured to be an easy lay up to hav­ing the rest of the sea­son can­celled, with the next sea­son in real doubt. They seemed to have the pres­id­ency in hand, a ma­jor­ity in the Sen­ate very likely, and, while win­ning a ma­jor­ity in the House was al­ways un­real­ist­ic, they did seem to have a good chance to cut the GOP...

Read more »
More Columns »
Sign up for Charlie’s columns as they are released on NationalJournal.com »

Columnists

Amy Walter, National Editor

Amy Walter is the Cook Political Report's National Editor. In her weekly column, Walter provides analysis of the issues, trends, and events that shape the national political environment.
View Columns »

Elizabeth Wilner, Senior Contributing Editor

Elizabeth Wilner is Senior Vice President of Kantar Media Ad Intelligence with oversight of its Campaign Media Analysis Group (CMAG), Contributing Editor of The Cook Political Report, and former Political Director of NBC News. Wilner's weekly segment, "On Points," covers the fast-growing junction of advertising, Big Data, and politics.
View Columns »

The Cook Political Report Partisan Voting Index (PVI)

The 2014 Partisan Voting Index

Since 1997, the Cook Political Report's Partisan Voting Index (PVI) has been the gold standard in measuring how each state and district performs at the presidential level relative to the nation as a whole. Click below for the breakdown of PVI for every House district in the 113th Congress.
See Chart »
Read More »

The Rhodes Cook Letter

In the latest issue of the Rhodes Cook Letter, Rhodes takes a close look at the 2016 election.

Download »

The 2016 Political Environment

Updated November 25, 2015 | As the 2016 election cycle begins to take shape, the Cook Political Report has identified several metrics worth monitoring between now and Election Day.

Read full report »

Sign Up